June 2017 Workshop: Studying inclusiveness in biology undergraduate classrooms and research spaces

June 2017 Workshop: Studying inclusiveness in biology undergraduate classrooms and research spaces

  The Environments and Metrics in Biology Education and Research (EMBER) RCN-UBE Incubator Project seeks to generate innovative measures to increase retention and diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). In June 2017 at Harris-Stowe College in St Louis, MO, a workshop is being organized to discuss coordination efforts for a network to initiate and communicate ideas for collaborations. The meeting hopes to attract and capitalize on the unique insights of interested educators from a multitude of relevant disciplines including biology, education, psychology and sociology. The meeting is also looking for junior researchers interested to attend.   The workshop is recruiting researchers in biology, education, psychology, and sociology fields interested in fostering inclusion and diversity in STEM programs. The EMBER network will be holding a three-day conference on the campus of Harris-Stowe State University, an historically black college located in midtown St. Louis, Missouri. Travel stipends are available, and postdocs and graduate students interested in these topics are encouraged to apply. If you would like to apply or register, see info here: to present, you can access the form here; registration for the meeting can be found here (registration is $27.37).     The PI, Jana Marcette, stated that the goals of the workshop were driven by the observation that about half of undergraduate Biology majors switch or leave without completing their declared degree. The formation of this network aims to improve biology student retention and diversity to bolster the STEM workforce. Jana hopes that the meeting will open both dialog and collaboration among social science, biology and education researchers to create metrics for inclusivity in biology classrooms and research spaces.   Addressing diversity, inclusion, equity and access in...
What Career Awareness and Development Resources Are There for Junior Scientists? A Workshop at the 2016 ASCB meeting

What Career Awareness and Development Resources Are There for Junior Scientists? A Workshop at the 2016 ASCB meeting

This is a guest post by Future of Research policy activist, Adriana Bankston.   Introduction Career development for junior scientists remains one of the most important issues in the biomedical research enterprise. Since the perceived notion is that the role of junior scientists is to drive science forward by working at the bench, training them for career success may not be a top priority. However, recent statistics state that only 10% of trainees go on to have a faculty position (Table 3–18 in (National Science Foundation, 2014)). Therefore, training graduate students and postdocs for success in non-research careers beyond the bench must be a major focus of the enterprise. While many U.S. institutions have developed very useful career development programming in this regard, the career training landscape for junior scientists is still inconsistent across the country and may also be lacking important components to help academics transition into non-research careers.   Improving career training for junior scientists can only be achieved if we know what they need from the system. Traditionally, although this is beginning to change, junior scientists haven’t had a strong voice in the matter. At Future of Research, we want to help junior scientists transition into their desired career paths, while giving them a voice in the process. In our workshops, we asked trainees about which career resources they are currently using/finding useful, and what resources they would like to have for career success. We plan to use this information to create a resource on our website, which we hope will be useful towards improving career training for junior scientists.      Previous career workshops In...
Upcoming FoR Meeting in Vancouver  Feb 20th 2017

Upcoming FoR Meeting in Vancouver Feb 20th 2017

The first FoR meeting in 2017 will be in Vancouver on February 20th, 2017.   Information about the meeting is continually being updated here at our FoR Vancouver 2017 page.     FoR Vancouver represent early-career researchers from across Vancouver and British Columbia, from Simon Fraser University to the University of British Columbia to the University of Victoria. Current job structures in science, and opportunities for funding, training, and support make careers in research unpredictable and insecure for many of Canada’s most passionate young scientists. However, a more sustainable career environment could secure world-leading science in Canada and BC, which will be vital to deal with health, environmental, agricultural, and economic challenges to come.   The Future of Research Vancouver Symposium 2017 On February 20th, 2017, we will be holding the first FoR Vancouver symposium, bringing together early-career researchers from across BC to discuss challenges facing the future of Canadian science, including: 1) Funding for early career researchers 2) Training and transparency of career outcomes of early career researchers 3) Increased connectivity – how to promote and strengthen conversations about research and infrastructure between research institutions and provinces 4) The structure of the scientific workforce   We are proud to announce our speakers and panellists for FoRVan 2017! Keynote address: Hon. Andrew Wilkinson, Minister of Advanced Education Dr. Liisa Galea, neuroscientist and science policy advocate Dr Laya Boyd, neuroscientists, Canada Research Chair and CIHR delegate Other panellists will include representatives from local industry and not-for-profit groups; to be announced!   Preliminary Schedule: February 20th, 2017 2:00 – 2:30 – Registration 2:30 – 3:15 – Keynote 3:20 – 4:30 – Interactive...
Register now for NYU PoIntS 2016 on November 14th

Register now for NYU PoIntS 2016 on November 14th

Register now for the NYU Postdoc Interdisciplinary Symposium (PoIntS) 2016! More information can be found here at the page on the FoR website and at the NYU Postdocs website.   This year’s keynote speaker is Paula Stephan, a labor economist who studies early-career scientists and the economics of the postdoc position in the scientific enterprise. She is the author of the book, “How Economics Shapes Science.” There will be a small number of copies of her book available for sale for $15 at the meeting.   Jessica Polka, president of FoR and Director of ASAPbio, the movement to promote the use of preprints in biology, will speak on postdoc advocacy.   Last year’s keynote speaker, Ethan Perlstein, recently appeared in an article in Nature, “Young scientists ditch postdocs for biotech start-ups.”   Check out the websites for more information and register at www.nyup.us!    ...
Advocating for Science Symposium Travel Awardee Alex Erwin: Dear Scientist, you are the best spokesperson for science. Here’s how to be effective.

Advocating for Science Symposium Travel Awardee Alex Erwin: Dear Scientist, you are the best spokesperson for science. Here’s how to be effective.

This is a guest post written by Advocating for Science Travel Awardee, Alex Erwin:     Even though most of us are happily pursuing what we love, that doesn’t mean that we aren’t frustrated with certain aspects of the scientific enterprise. Concerns about research funding, graduate and postdoctoral training, and how to improve relations between science and the public are prevalent. We often share our our frustrations with peers but we do ourselves a great disservice by not communicating our issues beyond colleagues. This is wherescience advocacy comes in. To make improvements to the science endeavor, we have to effectively communicate with the people who have the power to make changes. It’s important to remember that scientists aren’t a special interest group, but scientists do have the best understanding of what is at stake if science isn’t supported. Depending on the issue you’re trying to address, relevant decision makers may be your department head, university administrators, local legislators, or representatives at the national level. It’s also important to remember that anyone you meet day-to-day is a fellow constituent and taxpayer, making their opinion influential to decision-makers. This last September, there was a symposium dedicated specifically to science advocacy. The Advocating for Science Symposium was held on the MIT campus and was a joint effort by two non-profits consisting of early career scientists, The Future of Research and Academics for the Future of Science, and the MIT Graduate Student Council. Because being a graduate student in Kansas limits my exposure to these kinds of resources, I was especially eager for the opportunity to attend a meeting like this so I could bring...
Advocating for Science Symposium Travel Awardee Adriana Bankston: Advocating for Science Meeting Highlights

Advocating for Science Symposium Travel Awardee Adriana Bankston: Advocating for Science Meeting Highlights

This is a guest post written by Advocating for Science Travel Awardee, Adriana Bankston:     The “Advocating for Science” symposium and workshop took place at MIT on September 16-17, 2016. The meeting was co-organized by the Future of Research and Academics for the Future of Science organizations, together with the MIT Graduate Student Council. I was fortunate enough to be one of six people to be awarded a travel scholarship to attend this meeting. The ability to voice my opinions and questions about science advocacy, as well as brainstorm with other junior scientists on how we can better advocate for science was very exciting. I thus left the meeting fueled with great excitement and drive to improve the scientific enterprise, and I am very grateful for this opportunity.                                   The meeting began with introductions from the organizers, which included Gary McDowell (Future of Research), Christin Glorioso (Academics for the Future of Science) and Daniel Curtis (MIT Graduate Student Council). The goal of the Future of Research organization is to represent junior scientists, through grassroots advocacy, to promote systemic change to the way we do science. Some key points from Gary McDowell’s talk which stood out are: 1) Learning how to advocate is very important for getting junior voices heard 2) We need a scientific enterprise, not just an academic one. How we can better imagine a scientific enterprise in which people are using their scientific passion to benefit society, rather than just benefiting an academic system?   The Academics for the Future...