March for Science: FoR Events and Partners

March for Science: FoR Events and Partners

  The March for Science is nearly upon us! As partners of the march in DC, as well as several satellite marches, we wanted to pass along info about events and logistics. There are over 500 Marches worldwide, so even if you aren’t near any of the marches mentioned below, you can find info on all of them at the . If you are interested in participating in a March but are not sure where the closest march is, visit the March for Science March information page, where you can find the March nearest you, and sign up.   Information about marching in general We have just published a post, “How international scientists can advocate, and how U.S. scientists can support them” with information on marching and advocacy, with further resources, to provide information to try to address concerns and questions people may have about marching. Please contact info [at] futureofresearch.org with questions/comments.     March partners and events Future of Research is officially partnered with the march in Washington DC, and with the satellite marches in Minnesota, Chicago, and Louisville. We will be participating directly in events at the DC March (a Teach-in) and the San Francisco March (on a panel) as detailed below!   March for Science DC Event Details: https://www.marchforscience.com/event-details     Future of Research Teach-in: Juan Pablo Ruiz of Labmosphere, also a lead organizer of a FoR meeting currently being planned in Maryland on mentoring in academia, will be leading a Teach-in, “Challenges in becoming a scientist”, discussing real actions to be taken in advocating for junior scientists. Register here! See also the Facebook event here.    ...
How Early Career Scientists can serve science through policy: A workshop at the 2017 AAAS Meeting

How Early Career Scientists can serve science through policy: A workshop at the 2017 AAAS Meeting

This post was originally published on the Academics for the Future of Science (AFS) blog on April 14, 2017. Re-posting with permission from AFS. Picture by Jessica Polka. Early career researchers aspire to engage with society while still pursuing their research careers. They may engage by contributing directly to policy decisions or by becoming community advocates. This type of engagement is critical for making the public understand what science is and what scientists do. At the same time, it gives junior scientists multiple avenues by which to serve society through policy. The goal of a recent AAAS meeting session, entitled “How Early Career Scientists Can Serve Science Through Policy,” was to gain perspective on and explore such avenues for engagement with society. The session was coordinated by Georgia Lagoudas, a graduate student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Broad Institute, and Abigail Regitsky, a treasurer for the MIT Science Policy Initiative. This is a group of graduate (and some undergraduate) students whose goal is to create better scientists and engineers as well as a better society through rigorous research and authentic engagement with public policy. The presenters in the session were: Noelle Selin, an Associate Professor at MIT and Associate Director for the MIT Technology and Policy Program; John Gavenonis, a Technical and Business Manager at the DuPont Experimental Station; and Paula Garcia, an Energy Analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists.   Consider your goal In general, the presenters advised early career scientists to engage not only with policymakers but also with interdisciplinary researchers studying all aspects of a problem, as a helpful strategy for having a...