In Defense of Science: the National Science Policy Network

In Defense of Science: the National Science Policy Network

In Defense of Science: The National Science Policy Network Is Helping the Next Generation of Civic Scientists and Engineers to Organize Nationwide Network Receives More than $100,000 in Grants for Local Work   See this op-ed in Scientific American.   From the National Science Policy Network:   The National Science Policy Network (NSPN) is excited to announce a major new effort to support early-career science policy groups nationwide. With the support of Schmidt Futures and other national partners, NSPN will significantly increase assistance to grassroots STEM groups advocating for greater engagement of the scientific community in policy and advocacy.   The political turmoil of the past year has catalyzed civic engagement amongst members of the scientific community. New data from a survey conducted by NSPN earlier this year shows that out of 22 science policy groups surveyed, 45% have launched within the past year and a half, and 60% of all groups operate on an annual budget of $1,200 or less.   To support the growing trend of civic scientists, NSPN is launching three programs focused on providing training and resources.   First, we are providing microgrants for early-career science policy groups, giving seed funding to support high-impact projects and facilitate the growth of smaller, underfunded groups. Second, we are collaborating with Research!America on the Bipartisan Candidate Engagement Initiative to raise awareness among candidates running for national office on the importance of scientific research. Third, we are hosting a fall symposium in NYC to bring together student science policy, advocacy, and communication groups from across the country.   All of this is available at a new website that also...
Call for International Network for the Science of Team Science (INSciTS) Board of Directors Nominations

Call for International Network for the Science of Team Science (INSciTS) Board of Directors Nominations

See below for a call for nominations on the BoD of the International Network for the Science of Team Science (INSciTS) – they are interested in applications from emerging scholars: INSciTS Board of Directors Nominations, Deadline June 22, 2018 For those of you who were not able to attend the SciTS conference in Galveston this year, I am writing to let you know that we have, under the guidance of our advisory board and with generous funding from UTMB, decided to form a 501c3 – the International Network for the Science of Team Science (INSciTS).  INSciTS will now be the new official society of our Science of Team Science community. The formation of INSciTS allows us to: 1. Engage in long-term strategic planning beyond the scope of annual conference planning 2. Develop and deliver ongoing academic and professional development throughout the year to support long-term career growth 3. Foster academic and practice interest/working groups to generate an even more robust evidence base to inform practice Ultimately, we aspire to the following INSciTS vision: INSciTS will create and facilitate a high-impact community that develops and disseminates an evidence-base to support team science and shapes how research is conducted to solve complex problems. Currently, our Board of Directors includes:   Maritza Salazar Campo (President) Kevin Wooten (Treasurer) Holly Falk-Krzesinski (Secretary) Gaetano Lotrecchiano (President-Elect).  We seek to fill up to 8 more positions on our board and nominations are open until June 22nd! We encourage you to become part of the leadership to shape the direction of our organization.  For more information about how to nominate yourself or someone else to the board, please see the attached document. ...
Join us in crowdsourcing journal policies May 31st: Which journals recognize co-reviews by graduate students and postdocs?

Join us in crowdsourcing journal policies May 31st: Which journals recognize co-reviews by graduate students and postdocs?

Data from an eLife Early Career Researcher Group survey   At a recent meeting about journal peer review, one of the key outcomes was the realization that there needs to be a greater effort to recognize the scholarly contributions of graduate students and postdocs.   “Ghostwriting” of peer reviews, whereby the name of graduate students and postdocs is not passed on to, acknowledged or collected by the journal, but is instead submitted solely under the name of the PI is an apparently widespread but unrecognized phenomenon. For example, data in a recent survey conducted by the eLife Early Career Researcher Group, showed that nearly 60% of graduate students and postdocs surveyed saw no involvement by their supervisor in preparing a peer review report.   It’s clear that a number of journals do recognize that early career researchers are involved in the peer review process – but which ones? What do they require in the reporting of co-reviewers, and what language sets the expectation for this reporting? To which journals can early career researchers be directing their efforts to participated in, and be recognized for, peer review? And by recognize, this does not mean publicly disclosing the names – merely that the journal editor knows who has really carried out the review, likely key data in a climate where it is claimed there are too few reviewers to carry out all peer review.   We are therefore excited to announce, as part of an upcoming project at Future of Research on recognizing the contribution of and empowering early career researchers, that we are partnering with a number of actors in this space...
Future of Research Board of Directors issues response to NSF Sexual Harassment policy

Future of Research Board of Directors issues response to NSF Sexual Harassment policy

The Board of Directors of Future of Research has submitted a response to the National Science Foundation’s request for comment on Reporting Requirements Regarding Findings of Sexual Harassment, Other Forms of Harassment, or Sexual Assault. You can find the statement here as a downloadable PDF and below. At time of writing, there was still time to comment (comments due end May 4th 2018); we urge you to submit comments here. Future of Research Response to the National Science Foundation’s request for comment on Reporting Requirements Regarding Findings of Sexual Harassment, Other Forms of Harassment, or Sexual Assault Future of Research (FoR) is an early-career researcher-led nonprofit that seeks to champion, engage and empower early career scientists with evidence-based resources to improve the scientific research endeavor. The hypercompetitive research system and the dependence on faculty for research and career development create a power dynamic that can facilitate exploitation and harassment. For the approximately 45% of graduate students in science and engineering, and 55% of postdocs on temporary visas that are tied to their employment status, this dynamic is even more skewed. Many early career researchers thus cannot report sexual harassment without endangering their careers and/or immigration status. We therefore applaud and support the National Science Foundation’s proposed changes in Important Notice No. 144 issued February 4th 2018.   Data illustrating the landscape and power dynamics that make academe an environment particularly conducive to sexual harassment of postdocs were discussed by Future of Research President Dr. Jessica Polka and National Postdoctoral Association Chair Dr. Kate Sleeth at the Fourth Committee Meeting of The Committee on Impacts of Sexual Harassment in Academia as...
Join us TODAY (October 31st) 1pm EST for a Tweetchat about NIH’s new Next Generation Researchers Initiative

Join us TODAY (October 31st) 1pm EST for a Tweetchat about NIH’s new Next Generation Researchers Initiative

Don’t forget to follow along with our Tweetchat as FoR Board Member and NIH Next Generation Researchers Initiative Working Group Member Juan Pablo Ruiz (@HappyStemCell) tells us about the NGRI.   Don’t forget after the chat to go to our urgent call for action to send your thoughts to the NIH about the NGRI proposal....
Future of Research issues comment on HHS DRAFT Strategic Plan FY 2018 – 2022

Future of Research issues comment on HHS DRAFT Strategic Plan FY 2018 – 2022

The draft HHS Strategic Plan is part of a strategic planning process for the Department of Health and Human Services to coordinate its strategic and performance planning efforts. Comments have been open for submission on various comments, and FoR has submitted the following statements on Objective 4.2: “Objective 4.2: Expand the capacity of the scientific workforce and infrastructure to support innovative research As science and technology advance, it is imperative that research staff and scientists involved in HHS-conducted or HHS-supported research have the resources needed to conduct high quality and efficient work. Through various initiatives and programs, HHS recruits and trains students, recent graduates, and other professionals to conduct rigorous and reproducible research. HHS invests in Federal statistical units responsible for national surveys that provide reliable, timely and policy relevant information for policy makers and researchers. Additionally, HHS provides research training and career development opportunities to ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained investigators will be available across the range of scientific disciplines necessary to address the Nation’s biomedical and scientific research needs. HHS invests substantial resources in research facilities that provide access to instruments, technologies, services, as well as access to expert consultants.”   Short form statement (1000 Character limit on online submission form): Future of Research supports the initiative to expand the capacity of the scientific workforce and infrastructure towards innovative research. We endorse increasing collaboration, transparency and establishing research practices that promote rigor and reproducibility. We recommend an increased proportion of graduate students and postdocs be supported on training grants and fellowships, and encourage both institutions and federal agencies to track all trainees supported by...